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Nut cheezes on the other hand are dead simple to make. You want a benign flavoured nut. Cashews are perfect for a fresh soft Chèvre or Goat Cheeze. Skinless almonds make a lovely Ricotta style cheeze and Macadamias are good for a firmer, mature cheeze. Most other nuts have too much of an individual nut taste to use as a base for a cheeze. There are two things you want to get right. You need your nuts as soft as possible to blend them to a creamy mix. And you want as little liquid as possible, so they can hold a shape. I find if I pour boiling water over my nuts, allow that to cool, and let them soak overnight in the fridge, I get them as soft as is possible. When I’m ready, I pour away all the water and blend adding as little water as I can get away with to get the soaked nuts to a creamy mixture.

Food market

Food market

To make a French Chèvre use blended cashew nuts, add lemon juice and salt to taste. Shape into little logs in wax paper and set in the refrigerator. Roll in chopped fresh herbs or cracked black pepper before serving.
To make a Sweet Almond Ricotta use blended peeled almonds, add vanilla, a dash salt and a sweetener to taste. Serve in a small round bowl and use for desserts.
To make a Mature Cheeze use blended macadamia nuts blend and add 2 – 3 probiotic capsules. Wrap in a cloth and allow to drain in a sieve on top of a bowl at room temperature for 24 – 48 hours. It will cultivate. The colour will darken and the flavour will change. Remove from cloth and mash with a fork. You can add acids such as vinegar or lemon juice and salt at this stage. Do not add them before as they will kill the bacteria. I only add miso, nutritional yeast and a bit of salt to my mature cheeze. Shape into rounds and then flatten slightly. This goes well with French bread and fresh grapes or figs.

Green salad with pea and rice rissoles

Green salad with pea and rice rissoles

Every village, town or city will have a food market. Some are small, while others take up a whole section of the city. Market Day may only be one day a week, or a bigger place may have Market Day – every day. You can ask at the Tourism Office or check with locals. Fresh produce is the main attraction, but they sell quite a bit of animal foods. And sometimes – sadly – even live animals! Complimentary products like baskets, herbs, plants and even clothes also feature. Much as we love the markets, they are not always good value. Supermarkets have as good produce, at better prices. But the hype, energy, tastings and vendors vying for your custom are a treat. You sometimes meet the farmers face to face and they throw in a bit extra for free. And you find items you would never see at the supermarkets. Mixed colour carrots, white asparagus and black radishes for example. We never miss a Market Day, even if all we buy is one or two items.

Vegan milk, yogurt and ice cream

Vegan milk, yogurt and ice cream

Most supermarkets have an organic (bio) section in the produce area where they put organic fruit and veg together. We still like to check out the normal produce, and local food in season is always cheapest. Favourite French fruits are melons, peaches, nectarines, apples, grapes, pears and apricots. Typical French veggies include courgettes, aubergines, garlic, onions, tomatoes, mushrooms, peppers, lettuces and potatoes. Most names are similar to the English name i.e. apricots – abricots; tomato – tomate. And then some are nothing like their English counterparts i.e. apple – pomme; mushroom – champignon. You’re usually expected to weigh and label your produce before you pay at the till. If the item is listed as vrac, it means it’s loose. If it says pièce it means the whole item or the price per pack.

We’ve also noticed a regional produce section in many supermarkets. They have an aisle or section where they showcase only local foods. Usually long-life items like wines, olives, honey, mustards as well as things like mugs, kitchen towels and other items with either the local crest or some image reminiscent of that particular region. We’ve found excellent wines at bargain prices in the regional produce area.

Strawberry protein smoothie

Strawberry protein smoothie

My husband and I have a plant protein smoothie every single morning of our lives. You should find plant protein powders and Superfoods at local health shops. Google Happycow.net to find health shops in your area or ask at the Tourism Information Office. We always travel with our own protein powders sealed in Ziploc bags. Only need a powder to mess in your luggage once to learn that lesson. Soak oats overnight with vanilla extract to taste. In the morning, place in a tall jug and add a plant milk. Then add a fruit such as pear, banana, berries or melon. Next add a spoon of any nut butter, avocado or coconut oil. Add in protein powders and Superfood powders. Finish off with flavours or spices. Blend with a stick blender until smooth and serve. If that doesn’t set you up for the day, nothing will.

More next week . . . . .

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